Thursday, 31 January 2013

PM’s address at the Inaugural Session of Delhi Sustainable Development Summit : Speech : Prime Minister of India - Dr. Manmohan Singh


  Speech

January 31, 2013
New Delhi

PM’s address at the Inaugural Session of Delhi Sustainable Development Summit

“I am very happy to be present here today in the midst of such a distinguished gathering on the occasion of the inaugural session of the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit 2013. I would particularly like to extend a very warm welcome to the numerous foreign dignitaries who have come to Delhi from all over the world to attend this event.

Since 2001, the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit has evolved into a unique gathering in the global sustainable development calendar, attracting and providing a platform for some of the best minds and leaders from all over the world who have an abiding concern for protecting the fragile ecosystems of our planet. I congratulate The Energy and Resources Institute and Dr. Pachauri for this initiative and for their unstinted commitment to sustainable development.

The world community met in Rio last year on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the path-breaking Rio Summit of 1992. Rio+20 was a poignant reminder that the ambitious goals that we had set for ourselves at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 remain far from being realized. It also served to remind us that a meaningful consensus on environmental and ecological issues is perhaps harder to achieve today than it was some 20 years ago.

But, it is not as if we have achieved nothing during this period. We have witnessed an extraordinary and welcome growth of environmental consciousness in the world and we can take great satisfaction from the fact that sustainable development today is an accepted and integral part of international discourse. The global environmental agenda and the global development agenda are now closely inter-linked, with the economic, environmental and social pillars of sustainable development providing a sound framework. The Rio principles of 1992 are still seen as relevant and fundamental, and were reaffirmed at Rio+20.

We in our India take due satisfaction in this development. Some 40 years ago, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was one of the few leaders of the developing world to be present at the Stockholm Conference. Even then, she had made our commitment to environmental protection clear. But she had also pointed out that our challenge was ensuring development for all. It is a matter of some satisfaction to us that recent discourse has seen an implicit understanding that unless we find pathways for development that address the concerns of all, rather than the interests of a select few, our objective of global sustainable development will remain elusive.

In this context, the theme of this year’s sustainable Summit, “The Global Challenge of Resource-Efficient Growth and Development”, has a particular resonance. Humanity has traditionally put its faith in advances of technology to resolve problems of resource scarcities. However, there is now a growing realization that there may be no easy alternatives for some resources, particularly environmental resources. Resource-efficiency is, thus, a necessary condition for sustainable development, and a key element of the economic pillar of sustainability.

In addition, there are genuine concerns that in an unequal world, scarcity of resources would affect the poor more adversely, and key resources may become accessible only to a small section of people on this planet, leading to the exclusion of a large number of people who live in poverty and persistent deprivation. Resource efficiency is thus a critical element of inclusive growth and development agenda. The challenge is to build resilient and efficient economies, which will eradicate poverty and also ensure that the poor, already living on the margins of survival, are not made even more vulnerable. As a corollary, we should enhance efforts to develop technologies that ensure efficiency gains, which allow for more equitable distribution and use of these available resources. A global growth model, which is both inclusive and sustainable, would also assist developing countries to pursue their national development objectives.

Climate change has become the face of many challenges in our pursuit of sustainable development. This problem can only be tackled through coordinated global action. It is therefore crucial to look at sustainable development from a global rather than a purely national perspective. Nevertheless, given the varying levels of development across the world, it is important that our responses be predicated on the principle of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities. I am happy that the recent Doha climate conference reaffirmed these principles. They should form the bedrock of future arrangements post-2020 and we should ensure that the development aspirations and poverty reduction efforts of the developing countries are not constrained.

The adoption of a second commitment period till 2020 under the Kyoto Protocol for emissions reductions by the industrialized world is also a welcome development. But, real progress cannot be achieved if developed countries are not willing to enhance their ambition levels.

For its part, our country is committed to meeting its domestic mitigation goal of reducing the emissions intensity of our GDP by 20-25% by year 2020 compared with 2005 levels. We have already taken several major steps on the path of low carbon growth. Now is the time for the richer industrialized countries to show that they too are willing to move decisively along this path. If they fail to do that in the commitments they will make under the Kyoto Protocol and other agreements, then it will be difficult to persuade governments, industry and the general public in India and other developing countries to step up the pace at which they are moving on this path.

When we talk about efficient use of resources, we have to also focus on many other areas which are crucial in ensuring the sustainability of the earth’s ecosystems. Biological diversity is an important environmental resource for developing countries, which touches the lives of common people. We have to ensure that this is preserved and used carefully, gainfully and sustainably. Last year, India hosted the 11th Conference of Parties to the UN Convention on Biodiversity in Hyderabad. An important outcome was the recognition of biodiversity as a driver of sustainable development and environmental protection and an agreement to create institutional mechanisms that would facilitate financial and technological flows to developing countries for protecting biodiversity. We hope that the decisions taken will be fully implemented.

We in India are fully conscious of the need to conserve our resources through their utilization in a truly sustainable manner. We believe that efficient use of resources has to begin with ensuring the efficiency of use of human resources, and this requires building skills, capabilities and systems by which countries can ensure higher efficiency in every human endeavour. In Hyderabad last year, I announced an allocation of $50 million as part of the Hyderabad pledge to strengthen the institutional mechanisms for biodiversity conservation in India.

In the field of climate change, our National Action Plan on Climate Change is now an important part of our development strategy, both nationally and at the level of states. One of its eight missions mandates the establishment of 20,000 MW of power generating potential using solar energy within the next 10 years. I also recall launching from this very platform in 2008 the TERI programme on ‘Lighting a Billion Lives’. I am informed that this programme has now benefitted around 2000 villages in the country where families and households are using lanterns charged by solar energy to provide them with clean, reliable and pollution-free lighting. This programme has also been extended to countries in Africa and other parts of Asia. The involvement of the private sector has helped in expanding this approach through market-based dissemination of solar lanterns and other forms of decentralized lighting systems based on photovoltaic technology. We invite our international partners to work with us to exploit the tremendous potential of renewable energy technologies in our country.

One resource of particular concern to us in India and in many other developing countries is that of fresh water. The depletion of groundwater has already become a major problem in many districts in our country. Meeting the rising urban demand for fresh water implies rising costs as supplies have to come from great and greater distances. Projections of water demand and availability give an alarming picture of rising scarcities. We need, therefore, to focus attention on water conservation and water efficiency with the sort of zeal that today drives energy conservation and efficiency in the use of energy.

I would also like to mention that protection of the environment and promoting development need not amount to a zero sum game. What is required is regulatory regimes that are transparent, accountable and subject to oversight and monitoring. Indeed, regulatory regimes are often the basic necessary condition to ensure that environmental and economic objectives are pursued in tandem.

Our experience has shown that success in sustainable development efforts is also dependent on the degree of use of innovative mechanisms. Adequate attention should, therefore, be given to the importance and economic value of ecosystem services in development strategies and policies, particularly while addressing the needs of the vulnerable and poor and marginalised communities. Concepts like Green National Accounting are useful tools that could help us ensure that goods and services are produced with minimal ecological and social impact.

Growing populations, changing consumption patterns and the consequent pressure on precious natural resources are real challenges that we face in our pursuit of economic growth and the amelioration of poverty. The present global inequities built into the global economic order are patently unsustainable. At the same time, we also have to share the ecological and economic space of only one Earth. This in turn will demand re-engineering our economies in ways that are both frugal and innovative in their use of scarce resources. This is where we must look for solutions in the future. India looks forward to working closely with the global community in this endeavour. With these words, I wish the Summit all success in its deliberations and I look forward to specific recommendations for pursuing a resource efficient and sustainable development strategy.

I thank you for your attention.”
 

Printed from the site http://www.pmindia.nic.in

PM’s address at the Inaugural Session of Delhi Sustainable Development Summit : Speech : Prime Minister of India - Dr. Manmohan Singh


  Speech

January 31, 2013
New Delhi

PM’s address at the Inaugural Session of Delhi Sustainable Development Summit

“I am very happy to be present here today in the midst of such a distinguished gathering on the occasion of the inaugural session of the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit 2013. I would particularly like to extend a very warm welcome to the numerous foreign dignitaries who have come to Delhi from all over the world to attend this event.

Since 2001, the Delhi Sustainable Development Summit has evolved into a unique gathering in the global sustainable development calendar, attracting and providing a platform for some of the best minds and leaders from all over the world who have an abiding concern for protecting the fragile ecosystems of our planet. I congratulate The Energy and Resources Institute and Dr. Pachauri for this initiative and for their unstinted commitment to sustainable development.

The world community met in Rio last year on the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the path-breaking Rio Summit of 1992. Rio+20 was a poignant reminder that the ambitious goals that we had set for ourselves at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992 remain far from being realized. It also served to remind us that a meaningful consensus on environmental and ecological issues is perhaps harder to achieve today than it was some 20 years ago.

But, it is not as if we have achieved nothing during this period. We have witnessed an extraordinary and welcome growth of environmental consciousness in the world and we can take great satisfaction from the fact that sustainable development today is an accepted and integral part of international discourse. The global environmental agenda and the global development agenda are now closely inter-linked, with the economic, environmental and social pillars of sustainable development providing a sound framework. The Rio principles of 1992 are still seen as relevant and fundamental, and were reaffirmed at Rio+20.

We in our India take due satisfaction in this development. Some 40 years ago, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was one of the few leaders of the developing world to be present at the Stockholm Conference. Even then, she had made our commitment to environmental protection clear. But she had also pointed out that our challenge was ensuring development for all. It is a matter of some satisfaction to us that recent discourse has seen an implicit understanding that unless we find pathways for development that address the concerns of all, rather than the interests of a select few, our objective of global sustainable development will remain elusive.

In this context, the theme of this year’s sustainable Summit, “The Global Challenge of Resource-Efficient Growth and Development”, has a particular resonance. Humanity has traditionally put its faith in advances of technology to resolve problems of resource scarcities. However, there is now a growing realization that there may be no easy alternatives for some resources, particularly environmental resources. Resource-efficiency is, thus, a necessary condition for sustainable development, and a key element of the economic pillar of sustainability.

In addition, there are genuine concerns that in an unequal world, scarcity of resources would affect the poor more adversely, and key resources may become accessible only to a small section of people on this planet, leading to the exclusion of a large number of people who live in poverty and persistent deprivation. Resource efficiency is thus a critical element of inclusive growth and development agenda. The challenge is to build resilient and efficient economies, which will eradicate poverty and also ensure that the poor, already living on the margins of survival, are not made even more vulnerable. As a corollary, we should enhance efforts to develop technologies that ensure efficiency gains, which allow for more equitable distribution and use of these available resources. A global growth model, which is both inclusive and sustainable, would also assist developing countries to pursue their national development objectives.

Climate change has become the face of many challenges in our pursuit of sustainable development. This problem can only be tackled through coordinated global action. It is therefore crucial to look at sustainable development from a global rather than a purely national perspective. Nevertheless, given the varying levels of development across the world, it is important that our responses be predicated on the principle of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities. I am happy that the recent Doha climate conference reaffirmed these principles. They should form the bedrock of future arrangements post-2020 and we should ensure that the development aspirations and poverty reduction efforts of the developing countries are not constrained.

The adoption of a second commitment period till 2020 under the Kyoto Protocol for emissions reductions by the industrialized world is also a welcome development. But, real progress cannot be achieved if developed countries are not willing to enhance their ambition levels.

For its part, our country is committed to meeting its domestic mitigation goal of reducing the emissions intensity of our GDP by 20-25% by year 2020 compared with 2005 levels. We have already taken several major steps on the path of low carbon growth. Now is the time for the richer industrialized countries to show that they too are willing to move decisively along this path. If they fail to do that in the commitments they will make under the Kyoto Protocol and other agreements, then it will be difficult to persuade governments, industry and the general public in India and other developing countries to step up the pace at which they are moving on this path.

When we talk about efficient use of resources, we have to also focus on many other areas which are crucial in ensuring the sustainability of the earth’s ecosystems. Biological diversity is an important environmental resource for developing countries, which touches the lives of common people. We have to ensure that this is preserved and used carefully, gainfully and sustainably. Last year, India hosted the 11th Conference of Parties to the UN Convention on Biodiversity in Hyderabad. An important outcome was the recognition of biodiversity as a driver of sustainable development and environmental protection and an agreement to create institutional mechanisms that would facilitate financial and technological flows to developing countries for protecting biodiversity. We hope that the decisions taken will be fully implemented.

We in India are fully conscious of the need to conserve our resources through their utilization in a truly sustainable manner. We believe that efficient use of resources has to begin with ensuring the efficiency of use of human resources, and this requires building skills, capabilities and systems by which countries can ensure higher efficiency in every human endeavour. In Hyderabad last year, I announced an allocation of $50 million as part of the Hyderabad pledge to strengthen the institutional mechanisms for biodiversity conservation in India.

In the field of climate change, our National Action Plan on Climate Change is now an important part of our development strategy, both nationally and at the level of states. One of its eight missions mandates the establishment of 20,000 MW of power generating potential using solar energy within the next 10 years. I also recall launching from this very platform in 2008 the TERI programme on ‘Lighting a Billion Lives’. I am informed that this programme has now benefitted around 2000 villages in the country where families and households are using lanterns charged by solar energy to provide them with clean, reliable and pollution-free lighting. This programme has also been extended to countries in Africa and other parts of Asia. The involvement of the private sector has helped in expanding this approach through market-based dissemination of solar lanterns and other forms of decentralized lighting systems based on photovoltaic technology. We invite our international partners to work with us to exploit the tremendous potential of renewable energy technologies in our country.

One resource of particular concern to us in India and in many other developing countries is that of fresh water. The depletion of groundwater has already become a major problem in many districts in our country. Meeting the rising urban demand for fresh water implies rising costs as supplies have to come from great and greater distances. Projections of water demand and availability give an alarming picture of rising scarcities. We need, therefore, to focus attention on water conservation and water efficiency with the sort of zeal that today drives energy conservation and efficiency in the use of energy.

I would also like to mention that protection of the environment and promoting development need not amount to a zero sum game. What is required is regulatory regimes that are transparent, accountable and subject to oversight and monitoring. Indeed, regulatory regimes are often the basic necessary condition to ensure that environmental and economic objectives are pursued in tandem.

Our experience has shown that success in sustainable development efforts is also dependent on the degree of use of innovative mechanisms. Adequate attention should, therefore, be given to the importance and economic value of ecosystem services in development strategies and policies, particularly while addressing the needs of the vulnerable and poor and marginalised communities. Concepts like Green National Accounting are useful tools that could help us ensure that goods and services are produced with minimal ecological and social impact.

Growing populations, changing consumption patterns and the consequent pressure on precious natural resources are real challenges that we face in our pursuit of economic growth and the amelioration of poverty. The present global inequities built into the global economic order are patently unsustainable. At the same time, we also have to share the ecological and economic space of only one Earth. This in turn will demand re-engineering our economies in ways that are both frugal and innovative in their use of scarce resources. This is where we must look for solutions in the future. India looks forward to working closely with the global community in this endeavour. With these words, I wish the Summit all success in its deliberations and I look forward to specific recommendations for pursuing a resource efficient and sustainable development strategy.

I thank you for your attention.”
 

Printed from the site http://www.pmindia.nic.in

India will eventually need no aid: Bill Gates - Rediff.com Business

Billionaire philanthropist Bill Gates on Wednesday said India is becoming less dependent on aid and eventually would not need it.

His remark came while observing that economic growth is allowing many developing nations to devote more resources for their poorest people.

"The good news on resources is that many developing countries have growing economies that allow them to devote more resources to helping their poorest people. India, for example, is less dependent on aid and will eventually not need it," Gates said in his annual letter.

Ministry-wise PIB Releases

Wednesday, 30 January 2013

EU Accession for the Western Balkans | Stratfor

EU Accession for the Western Balkans

Analysis

Increased membership has long been a foreign policy objective for the European Union. Since its inception in 1957 as the European Economic Community, the European Union has grown from six members (West Germany, France, Italy, the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg) to 27 members, and more are on the way. Croatia became an acceding country in 2012 -- its formal accession is slated for July -- while Iceland, Montenegro, Serbia, Macedonia and Turkey have been granted candidacy status. Brussels has also deemed Albania, Bosnia-Herzegovina and Kosovo potential candidates. Once a country has been accepted as a candidate, it begins formal negotiations led by the EU Commission to implement the economic, political and institutional reforms required for EU membership. The designation of "candidate country" does not imply a specific timeline for accession; in fact, negotiations do not have particular deadlines. As a result, the candidacy status does not ensure immediate EU accession. More countries -- especially those in the Western Balkans -- are likely to join the European Union, but the process will extend to the end of the decade. Unlike previous periods of growth, the European Union lacks real strategic interests in incorporating most of the current candidates, which have small economies and already are surrounded by EU and NATO members. Furthermore, political fragmentation within the European Union tempers any desire to grow further. After nearly doubling its membership from 2004 to 2007, the European Union will become more selective in its incorporation of new members. At the same time, the ongoing crisis will make the European Union somewhat less attractive to potential members, which will be reluctant to implement structural reforms if they believe the costs of reform outweigh the benefits of membership.

Jessica Hagy - Picture This - Forbes

Verbal Resolutions: 12 Upgrades to Your Vocabulary for the New Year

Let’s say more in better ways, and say less more often. Let’s speak our minds, but only when our thoughts are clear.
Let’s raise our voices to just the right level this year.

January: Sanitize the potty mouth.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Resolve to swear more creatively and eloquently. You’ll sound smarter than you are furious, and you’ll better infuriate those who have irked you.

February: Back-up an argument.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When asking for what you want, frame it so that it sounds like what everyone wants and desperately needs—they’ll get a sense of ownership and you’ll get a win.

March:  Say something kind.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Preferably, something more meaningful than, “nice shoes,” or “great job parking.” Pay attention to those around you so that you can make insightful and memorable comments. This is best done without ulterior motives that can tarnish an otherwise sterling sentiment.

April:  Bite your tongue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When very angry or deeply insulted, sometimes the wisest thing to do is simply glare before saying something that will be held against you later. Time to compose yourself also allows you to use January’s vocabulary augmentation to full effect.

May:  Boycott a piece of jargon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pick the phrase that sounds most like nails on a chalkboard to your ear and replace it with the layman’s term. You can trade euphemisms for truth and confusion for clarity. This is proof words matter.

June:  Ask about that nickname.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicknames are often like vestigial tails: bits of our past that have no reason to be attached to us any more. Ask someone about their nickname and what they really prefer to be called. They’ll appreciate either your curiosity regarding their nomenclature, or the opportunity to no longer be referred to as “Captain Nugget.”

July: Starve a troll.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

They hate losing their soapbox, even for a moment, and if you can manage to change the subject you’ll be deeply appreciated by everyone else in the room.

August: Practice your acceptance speech.

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the mirror, while getting ready in the morning, try to be concisely appreciative while leaving out the cringe-worthy humble-brags. It’s a surprisingly effective mood booster, not to mention it will make you feel grateful for the important people in your life.

September: Write a letter declaring your love.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use metaphors. Balance your cadence. Be flowery. Be silly. Be over-the-top. Be poetic. Then write it in ink, not in an email. If in an actual relationship, feel free to actually deliver it in person.

October: Negotiate by asking the right questions.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Know exactly what you want and what you’re willing to give up for it. Then find out exactly what your opponent wants. Often, your opposing wants aren’t so opposing, and everyone can walk away satisfied.

November: Learn some new body language.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re constantly gesticulating, wear a jacket with pockets. If you’re an eye-roller, practice eye contact. When your go-to communications crutches are put away, you’ll be able to strengthen your overall messages.

December: Adopt a motivational mantra. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It can be what matters most to you (the name of your spouse or favorite whiskey) or what drives you forward (your greatest dream or worst nemesis). Keep it in your mind, and repeat it when you need to focus.

God is no Autocrat

In Oriental cultures, they don't think of God as an autocrat. God is the fundamental energy of the world, which performs all this world without having to think about it. Alan Watts Today, whenever you think of it, turn your attention to the little gaps between the thoughts.

Tax residency: Min to make it easy for foreigners - Rediff.com Business

TaxThe government is likely to make it easier for foreigners to prove their residency for claiming benefits under bilateral tax treaties.

After softening the blow of the general anti-avoidance rules, the revenue department is now amending the rules for tax residency certificates, made mandatory in Budget 2012-13 for those availing of tax benefits under double-taxation avoidance agreements.

The move follows representations made by foreign investors and clarifications sought by some countries with regard to the TRC form and subsequent rules notified by the Central Board of Direct Taxes in September 2012.

Investors had raised concerns it would be troublesome for them to get the TRC that sought too many details from their resident country.

Investors had some issues.

"The rules will be changed.

"The new TRC will provide more clarity. We will make the form less burdensome,” said a finance ministry official who did not wish to be named.

Some countries have asked India [ Images ] to provide more clarity on whether TRC would have to be issued only once or for every transaction by an investor.

These nations have also asked how and after what period TRC would have to be renewed.

If a country is not willing to specify all this information in TRC or is taking a long time in issuing the certificate, an investor might be denied treaty benefits by Indian tax authorities.

They are saying after issuing the certificate how would their authorities make sure the address of the investor does not change later.

"They can’t know beforehand whether or not a company or individual would remain a resident the next day.

"That clarity will be provided in the new Rules,” said another official.

The form would be re-designed in such a way that investors could fill up most of the details themselves.

It could then be countersigned by the country issuing the certificate.

The existing form seeks details such as the name of the assessee, status (individual or company), nationality/country of registration, tax identification number, residential status, period for which the certificate is applicable, and address of the applicant.

The Finance Act 2012 had introduced a provision that required non-residents to submit a TRC from April 2013.

It is noticed that in many instances the taxpayers who are not tax residents of a contracting country do claim benefits under the DTAA entered into by the government with that country.

"Thereby, even third-party residents claim unintended treaty benefits, said the memorandum to the 2012-13 Budget.

India currently has DTTAs with over 80 countries and is in the process of revisiting some of those, such as the one with Mauritius, to check misuse of these agreements.

Infographic: Making Money the Old Fashioned Way

6

Despite the growth of social media and the internet, in-person networking is still an integral part of marketing for small businesses.

networking-survey-infographic_mini

MOO is an award-winning online print business that is passionate about great design and the difference it can make to its customers and the world. Launched in 2006, MOO aims to disrupt the $640 billion global print industry by combining the values of professional design with accessibility and reach of the web; making great design available to all. By applying Web 2.0 principles to a 500 year-old market, MOO has become one of the fastest growing print businesses in the world, with triple digit annual growth and a global reach since launch.  MOO prints millions of cards a month and has served customers in over 200 countries. MOO also empowers companies of 10 or more employees with MOO for Business, offering volume discounts and easy order management for entire organisations.  For more information, visit www.moo.com.

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