Wednesday, 28 June 2017

Did you know...

Did you know...

... that today is Bald Eagle Comeback Day? On June 28, 2007, in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., the bald eagle was officially removed from the list of threatened and endangered species, 40 years after coming close to extinction. After nearly disappearing from most of the United States, the bald eagle is now flourishing across the nation and no longer needs the protection of the Endangered Species Act!

~~~

Today's Inspirational Quote:

"One's destination is never a place, but a new way of seeing things."

-- Henry Miller

If You Don’t Prioritize Your Life, Someone Else Will Contributed by Greg McKeown on April 17, 2014 in Corporate Communications ghandi “A ‘no’ uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a ‘yes’ merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble.” So said Mahatma Gandhi, and we all know how his conviction played out on the world stage. But what is less well known is how this same discipline played out privately with his own grandson, Arun Gandhi. Arun grew up in South Africa. When he was a young boy, he was beaten up twice: once for being too white and once for being too black. Still angry, Arun was sent to spend time with his grandfather. In an interview with Arun, he told me that his grandfather was in demand from many important people, yet he still prioritized his grandson, spending an hour a day for 18 months just listening to Arun. It proved to be a turning point in Arun’s life. I had the opportunity to apply Gandhi’s example of prioritization to my own life, hours before one of my daughters was born. I felt pressure to go to a client meeting the next day. But on this occasion, I knew what to do. It was clearly a time to be there for my wife and child. So, when asked to attend the meeting, I said with all the conviction I could muster… “Yes.” To my shame, while my wife lay in the hospital with my hours-old baby, I went to the meeting. Afterward, my manager said, “The client will respect you for making the decision to be here.” But the look on the clients’ faces mirrored how I felt. What was I doing there?! I had not lived true to Gandhi’s saying. I had said “yes” to please. As it turned out, exactly nothing came of the client meeting. And even if the client had respected my choice, and key business opportunities had resulted, I would still have struck a fool’s bargain. My wife supported me and trusted me to make the right choice under the circumstances, and I had opted to deprioritize her and my child. Why did I do it? I have two confessions: First, I allowed social awkwardness to trump making the right decision. I wasn’t forced to attend the meeting. Instead, I was so anxious to please that even awkward silent pauses on the phone were too much for me. In order to stop the social pain, I said “yes” when I knew the answer should be “no.” Second, I believed that “I had to make this work.” Logically, I knew I had a choice, but emotionally, I felt that I had no choice. That one corrupted assumption psychologically removed many of the actual choices available to me. What can you do to avoid the mistake of saying “yes” when you know the answer should be “no”? First, separate the decision from the relationship. Sometimes these seem so interconnected, we forget there are two different questions we need to answer. By deliberately dividing these questions, we can make a more conscious choice. Answer the question, “What is the right decision?” and then “How can I communicate this as kindly as possible?” Second, watch your language. Every time we say, “I have to take this call” or “I have to send this piece of work off” or “I have to go to this client meeting,” we are assuming that previous commitments are nonnegotiable. Every time you use the phrase “I have to” over the next week, stop and replace it with “I choose to.” It can feel a little odd at first — and in some cases it can even be gut-wrenching (if we are choosing the wrong priority). But ultimately, using this language reminds us that we are making choices, which enables us to make adifferent choice. Third, avoid working for or with people who don’t respect your priorities. It may sound simplistic, but this is a truly liberating rule! There are people who share your values and as a result make it natural to live your priorities. It may take a while to find an employment situation like this, but you can set your course to that destination immediately. Saying “yes” when we should be saying “no” can seem like a small thing in the moment. But over time, such compromises can create a life of regrets. Indeed, an Australian nurse named Bronnie Ware, who cared for people in the last 12 weeks of their lives, recorded the most often-discussed regrets. At the top of the list: “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.” I have a vision of people everywhere having the courage to live a life true to themselves instead of the life others expect of them. To harness the courage we need to get on the right path, it pays to reflect on how short life really is, and what we want to accomplish in the little time we have left. As poet Mary Oliver wrote: “Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?” I challenge you to be wiser than I was on the day of my daughter’s birth. I have great confidence in the good that can come from such a decision. Years from now when you are on your death bed you may still have regrets. But seeking the way of the Essentialist is unlikely to be one of them. What would you trade then to be back here now for one chance—this chance—to be true to yourself? On that day what will you hope you decided to do on this one? Related Documents Building Effective Teams 110-slide PowerPoint presentation Executive Team Building 38-slide PowerPoint presentation About Greg McKeown Greg McKeown is a powerful listener, social innovator, inspirational speaker and the author of the "Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less." He is an accomplished public speaker. He regularly speaks to business communities, giving dozens of speeches per year. He has spoken at companies including Apple, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Salesforce.com, and Twitter and organizations including SXSW, Stanford University and the World Economic Forum.

If You Don’t Prioritize Your Life, Someone Else Will

ghandi
“A ‘no’ uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a ‘yes’ merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble.” So said Mahatma Gandhi, and we all know how his conviction played out on the world stage. But what is less well known is how this same discipline played out privately with his own grandson, Arun Gandhi.
Arun grew up in South Africa. When he was a young boy, he was beaten up twice: once for being too white and once for being too black. Still angry, Arun was sent to spend time with his grandfather. In an interview with Arun, he told me that his grandfather was in demand from many important people, yet he still prioritized his grandson, spending an hour a day for 18 months just listening to Arun. It proved to be a turning point in Arun’s life.
I had the opportunity to apply Gandhi’s example of prioritization to my own life, hours before one of my daughters was born. I felt pressure to go to a client meeting the next day. But on this occasion, I knew what to do. It was clearly a time to be there for my wife and child. So, when asked to attend the meeting, I said with all the conviction I could muster…
“Yes.”
To my shame, while my wife lay in the hospital with my hours-old baby, I went to the meeting. Afterward, my manager said, “The client will respect you for making the decision to be here.” But the look on the clients’ faces mirrored how I felt. What was I doing there?! I had not lived true to Gandhi’s saying. I had said “yes” to please.
As it turned out, exactly nothing came of the client meeting. And even if the client had respected my choice, and key business opportunities had resulted, I would still have struck a fool’s bargain. My wife supported me and trusted me to make the right choice under the circumstances, and I had opted to deprioritize her and my child.
Why did I do it? I have two confessions:
First, I allowed social awkwardness to trump making the right decision. I wasn’t forced to attend the meeting. Instead, I was so anxious to please that even awkward silent pauses on the phone were too much for me. In order to stop the social pain, I said “yes” when I knew the answer should be “no.”
Second, I believed that “I had to make this work.” Logically, I knew I had a choice, but emotionally, I felt that I had no choice. That one corrupted assumption psychologically removed many of the actual choices available to me.
What can you do to avoid the mistake of saying “yes” when you know the answer should be “no”?
First, separate the decision from the relationship. Sometimes these seem so interconnected, we forget there are two different questions we need to answer. By deliberately dividing these questions, we can make a more conscious choice. Answer the question, “What is the right decision?” and then “How can I communicate this as kindly as possible?”
Second, watch your language. Every time we say, “I have to take this call” or “I have to send this piece of work off” or “I have to go to this client meeting,” we are assuming that previous commitments are nonnegotiable. Every time you use the phrase “I have to” over the next week, stop and replace it with “I choose to.” It can feel a little odd at first — and in some cases it can even be gut-wrenching (if we are choosing the wrong priority). But ultimately, using this language reminds us that we are making choices, which enables us to make adifferent choice.
Third, avoid working for or with people who don’t respect your priorities. It may sound simplistic, but this is a truly liberating rule! There are people who share your values and as a result make it natural to live your priorities. It may take a while to find an employment situation like this, but you can set your course to that destination immediately.
Saying “yes” when we should be saying “no” can seem like a small thing in the moment. But over time, such compromises can create a life of regrets. Indeed, an Australian nurse named Bronnie Ware, who cared for people in the last 12 weeks of their lives, recorded the most often-discussed regrets. At the top of the list: “I wish I’d had the courage to live a life true to myself, not the life others expected of me.”
I have a vision of people everywhere having the courage to live a life true to themselves instead of the life others expect of them.
To harness the courage we need to get on the right path, it pays to reflect on how short life really is, and what we want to accomplish in the little time we have left. As poet Mary Oliver wrote: “Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious life?”
I challenge you to be wiser than I was on the day of my daughter’s birth. I have great confidence in the good that can come from such a decision.
Years from now when you are on your death bed you may still have regrets. But seeking the way of the Essentialist is unlikely to be one of them. What would you trade then to be back here now for one chance—this chance—to be true to yourself? On that day what will you hope you decided to do on this one?

Related Documents



110-slide PowerPoint presentation

38-slide PowerPoint presentation

About Greg McKeown

Greg McKeown is a powerful listener, social innovator, inspirational speaker and the author of the "Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less." He is an accomplished public speaker. He regularly speaks to business communities, giving dozens of speeches per year. He has spoken at companies including Apple, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn, Salesforce.com, and Twitter and organizations including SXSW, Stanford University and the World Economic Forum.

Tuesday, 27 June 2017

Courtesy: The SupplyChain Log newsletter

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Courtesy: The Ethics Guy Newsletter

The Ethics Guy Newsletter
June 26, 2017

Apple CEO Tim Cook Does This Every Day And So Should You
By Bruce Weinstein, Ph.D.
CEO, The Institute for High-Character Leadership
One character trait that distinguishes Apple CEO Tim Cook from other corporate leaders is his high level of accountability.
Accountable leaders do four things consistently:
1. They keep their promises
2. They consider the consequences of their actions
3. They take responsibility for their mistakes
4. They make amends for those mistakes
Let's take a look at promise keeping and why it is an essential component of Apple's financial success.
Accountable Leaders Keep Their Promises
Every year the Gallup Organization releases the results of its survey on honesty and ethical standards in the professions. Business executives are always rated among the least honest and ethical. Why is that? I submit that too often CEOs fail to remember that, as Walter Landor said, a brand is a promise. Forgetting this risks losing market capitalization, brand reputation, and above all, trustworthiness.
What exactly is the promise brands make?  Whatever the product (coffee, smartphones, cars) — or service (investing, consulting, construction), the promise is the same: “You can count on us to deliver what we say we’ll deliver. And if we don’t, we will make it right.”
Apple is wildly successful, and it isn’t only because they make cool gadgets. You wouldn't be anxious to get the next iPhone if the one you have now works only now and then and you can't find anyone at the company to help you. Tim Cook knows that the Apple logo represents a promise to consumers, and he takes that promise seriously. This is a major reason why, as Forbes notes, Apple "has the world's largest market capitalization (more than $610 billion as of December 2016) and the most profitable business in America."
Over the eight years or so that I've been a loyal Apple customer, I've had problems from time to time with my iMac, MacBook Pro, or iPhone. Every time I've called customer service or gone to a Genius Bar, I receive friendly help that solves the problem. If you own an Apple product, I'll bet you've had the same experience.
Accountability is cool — and profitable.

This essay originally appeared on Forbes.com. To read my other ethics columns for Forbes and to receive new ones as soon as they're published, please click here, then click "Follow" next to my photo.
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You question can be general ("What gets in the way of doing the right thing?") or specific (such as an ethical dilemma you're wrestling with at work).

The best way to submit it for consideration is through my website, TheEthicsGuy.com.

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Thank you for reading my newsletter. Stay tuned for another one soon!  I hope all is well with you.

Bruce

Bruce Weinstein, Ph.D.
The Ethics Guy®
CEO, The Institute for High-Character Leadership™
Author, The Good Ones: Ten Crucial Qualities of High-Character Employees

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Monday, 26 June 2017

Did you know...

Did you know... ... that today is Bald Eagle Comeback Day? On June 28, 2007, in a ceremony in Washington, D.C., the bald eagle was official...